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Solitude

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Solitude

Loose yourself

Solitude is not another word for loneliness. Far from it, in fact: solitude means space to think, time to reflect, and the chance to stop and appreciate the smaller things in life.
Iceland is a great place to enjoy some solitude – and the Westfjords region is the best place in Iceland to find it. Of course, even in the Westfjords there are some places which are more peaceful than others.
If you want to take a break from humanity in order to enjoy the company of other species, then try visiting one of the fjords without a town along its shores; without a village; without even a single house. Here you’ll only have noisy birds, basking seals, Arctic foxes, bees and insects, and possibly sheep and horses for company. Keep your eyes peeled and you may even spot whales or dolphins just offshore.
 

Find yourself

If you crave even less company than this, you could always climb a mountain. The mountains of the northern Westfjords are steep, tall and potentially dangerous – but follow a walking map and you can get to the high plateau safely. 
Once up there, you’ll probably not see anyone at all, and you will find the solitude your soul has been craving. No people, no birdsong, no traffic, no sheep. Just the whisper of the breeze (or the roar of the wind), and a wide summit of pebbles and small, hardy flowers and plants here and there. 
With views stretching literally hundreds of kilometres, this is solitude. This is as close as humans get to being plugged into a battery charger. 
Natural Pools

There is almost nothing better then taking a bath in a natural pool after a long day of travelling and driving all around. In the Westfjords region there are a few natural pools that you can try, both man made and natural. You could even drive the Westfjords only to attend all the geothermal pools. 

Wilderness and Wildlife

The Wild West of Iceland 

Every Icelandic region has its own draw for bird watchers and nature lovers, and reasons to visit the Westfjords include the millions of seabirds which use its high cliffs to nest. Places like Vigur island are also home to (alarmingly rare) stocks of breeding puffins. The region is an excellent place to encounter gyrfalcons and sea eagles, as well as snowy owls. There is also no shortage of breeding land birds, like the golden plover, whimbrel, and redshank.
 
Ever seen whales breaching beside the road as you drive along? Thanks to the coastal roads along deep fjords, the Westfjords might be one of the only places this is a regular occurrence. The same goes for seals casually basking on rocks, totally unconcerned by being watched.
 
The Westfjords is the land of the Arctic fox. These cute-but-shy mammals roam wild across Iceland, but your best chance of seeing them is in the Westfjords – especially on the Hornstrandir nature reserve, where they are protected from hunting and relatively tame as a result.
Take a view
Nature is no more evident in the Westfjords than in the landscape itself. The sheltered, crystal clear sea which fills the fjords is full of fish, and is great for diving, kayaking and sailing. In fact, taking a boat trip may actually be quicker than driving to some places. 
 
The mountains are everywhere. Coated in lush green summer grass and myriad wild herbs and meadow flowers, they provide the ultimate viewing platform atop the world. Between the sea and the mountains you’ll find seemingly endless coast, varying from precarious cliffs to beaches of sand or boulders; variety is the keyword. Westfjords beaches are an easy walk and an unbeatable place to relax the mind and invigorate the body. And don’t forget to keep an eye out for interesting shells, stones, glass and pottery.
 
The closest the Westfjords gets to flat land is often the many valleys between mountains. They are worlds of their own, often with a warm microclimate, an abandoned farmhouse or two, and no other sign of human interference.
Stunning places to see

Nature rules the Westfjords. Sure, humans have built their settlements here and there, but this remains a wild, untamed landscape. But it’s also a landscape that enjoys being discovered and enjoyed.

Westfjords of Iceland

Towns & Villages

The sparsely populated Westfjords region is home to more towns and villages than you might imagine – and each has its own unique atmosphere and attractions.
Get to know more about them here. 

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